The eye update

It’s been a while since I’ve written about my right eye. I just saw the local ophthalmologist yesterday for a work up, so now seems like a good time to do it. After seeing the doc I felt like I needed a big warm hug, which is a clue to me that my brain is trying to process through the possibilities we discussed. Writing usually helps me with the process, so here goes.

Way back when I was first diagnosed with I.C.E. Syndrome in October 2015, I thought I would need to have eye surgery within just a few months. In my usual, efficient mind-set, I was thinking I could just slot it in while I was recovering from my hysterectomy in December 2015 and not have to take any additional time off than the 6 weeks I was already scheduled to be out on short-term disability.

That didn’t happen, and in hind sight it was a good thing for several reasons. While it took me many months to adjust to the challenges caused by the corneal swelling and to find a medical regime that worked to keep my intraocular pressure (IOP) in the target range, I probably couldn’t have dealt with another health issue at the time. As it turned out, it was better for me to focus on getting my hormone replacement right, and to deal with the gut issues that kept taking me out of commission.

In the intervening time, I’ve been (mostly) quietly dealing with the progression of this eye disease. There are two doctors involved in my treatment: a local ophthalmologist, and another one in San Francisco who is a glaucoma specialist. The local eye doc is wonderful and can medically manage my condition; the specialist is primarily a surgeon and gets final say on when I’m at a point where surgical intervention is necessary, and which surgical procedure would be best for me.

Once I got the all-clear from the local eye doc, I had an optometry exam and got a new prescription and progressive eyeglasses. That’s helped a bit. One of my challenges, however, can’t be helped by eye gear very much.

My pupil is distorted in my right eye and can’t adjust as much as needed to changing light conditions. This means that moving from darker to lighter environments (or vice versa) is uncomfortable for me. Anytime I’m in brighter light conditions, I feel like my eye is being bombarded with light. (Because it is.) If you’ve ever walked into bright sunlight after being in a dark movie theater and had that “white blindness” feeling, that’s close to what I experience when I move from a dim indoors to outdoors, even on gloomy days. I got the types of lenses that darken in the sun in my eyeglasses, but that can’t take the place of a pupil that can properly dilate. Moving in the opposite direction (light to dark) has its own set of complications.

Cosmetically, the pupil distortion is visible, too, so I sometimes refer to my right eye somewhat jokingly as my “goat eye.” Not all people with I.C.E. Syndrome have visible changes in their iris, but the type of disease I have (Cogan-Reese) does have that result. The iris in my right eye looks darker and more blotchy. I have one dark brown spot in it, which my local eye doc says is actually not eye pigment, but is the actual muscle in my eye; the iris pigment has been completely worn away in that area.

I’m currently on three different eye drops (actually, it’s four meds since one drop is two medications combined in one) and my local eye doc tells me that I’m nearly at the end of the medical management options currently available. I’m going to try using one of the drops three times a day instead of twice a day to see if it reduces the IOP a bit, but that’s the absolute last option open to me medically. None of these meds are cheap, and it’s my bad luck the one he’s suggesting I increase to three times a day is the one that is the most expensive. It was $92 to refill it last time, and that’s with my insurance coverage. Yikes! (Yes, I did ask about a generic option and there is one, so I may start experimenting with it when my next refill is due.)

I had a thorough work up yesterday, including a visual field test and imaging of the optic nerve in both eyes. I’ve had the same tests done in October 2015 and October 2016, so we now have a chart showing how well my vision has been over time. It’s not terrible, but it’s trending downwards. My glaucoma is progressing, and since I’m still “fairly young” (just a few months away from 50) the doctor’s goal is to slow the progression as much as possible. He defers to the glaucoma specialist on making the decision about when to have surgery, but when he sends his notes and the summary of my tests, my local eye doc is clearly going to be suggesting surgical intervention at this point.

The eye doc and I talked over a few other issues and ideas yesterday, too. I asked about other treatments that would get straight to the root of the issue: the abnormal endothelial cells on my cornea which are causing the drainage issues in my eye (and, therefore, the glaucoma). He allowed that while there are surgeries to replace the endothelium, that’s not something that he sees as an option for me, but he’d ask the glaucoma specialist to weigh in.

Another option that the glaucoma doc will need to advise me on is whether it may be worthwhile to try anti-viral medications. While there hasn’t been a lot of research into this disease due to it being rare, some studies have suggested that EBV or HSV may play a role. Local eye doc says these are viruses that are present in most people, however it may be that sampling the eye fluid for them and then treatment with an anti-viral medication is something I can ask the glaucoma doc about.

One more issue the local doc wants the glaucoma specialist to express an opinion on is whether I should start using some eye drops in my left eye, too. I don’t have I.C.E. syndrome in that eye, nor do I have issues with the drainage angles, but I am showing some peripheral vision loss in it. Earlier this year he explained to me that the”cup to disc ratio” in my left eye suggests I’m more likely to develop glaucoma as I age, and since I’m already slowly going blind in my right eye, preserving the vision in my left eye as much as possible is his goal.

I see the glaucoma specialist in about a month, so I’ll know more about next steps then. In the meantime, I’m doing my best to deal with all this info and that I’m likely facing yet another surgery this year. I medicated myself with pizza and wine last night, but I’m thinking that I may need to find a local therapist soon. I’ve been doing my best to remain positive and resilient through all the health issues I’ve faced in the past three years, but sometimes it’s necessary to find professional help.

 

 

 

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “The eye update

  1. I was wondering how things were going with your eye. I failed to grasp all of the pieces until you explained them here like this. It sounds a bit scary that there aren’t that many medical interventions before surgery comes into play. My fingers are crossed that if and when it happens, it goes as well as is possible.

    Do you have enough time off to cover the time for the surgery and adequate recovery time?

    Like

    • Another reason surgery has been delayed is that it doesn’t necessarily help long term. Again, there’s very little data on this since it’s a rare disease, but it’s questionable if surgery is effective beyond 5 years. At that point, I guess, one hopes that better surgeries are available. I just don’t know.

      I should have enough time off available. If I need to take more than 5 work days in a row off then I get switched to short term disability. However, I’ve been finding that I need to allow many more than 5 days from my PTO pool for surgical recovery. Even when I’m back to work full time, there are still days where I need to take off 4-5 hours just for extra rest or doctor visits.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s