Moving thoughts

It seems that every day I feel both excited and terrified about the prospect of uprooting myself and moving away from Chicago. I was born and raised in Chicagoland (as my friend Adrienne likes to call it). Even though I spent about two years in total away from it while living in Toronto, it’s always been home to me.

I was a suburban girl for just over 20 years, and have spent another 20 living in the city of Chicago proper, so I know a lot about this area. Moving to the Bay area means starting over. I have to learn new weather phenomena and cycles, new neighborhoods, and new patterns of daily living. (That “turn left to turn right” driving thing in Silicon Valley is just as weird to me as the New Jersey jughandle.) There will be no “autopilot” to my days for a while, which I expect to find both exhilarating and exhausting.

While being off my feet for the past few weeks has forced me to change my daily habits and prioritize my non-work time differently, it has also allowed me to spend some guilt free time browsing the internet and absorbing as much as possible about the communities that make up the area. The original plan was to move to Silicon Valley and be attached to our office in San Jose. I have a friend in Santa Clara who has some insights into what SV life is like. She talks about spending her weekends hiking in the sunny mountains or lounging on the cool (yet still sunny) beaches around Santa Cruz. Occasionally it rains, but mostly it doesn’t, and the range of temperatures are not drastic, either. However, some things have happened to change my mind.

First, there was my vacation. (This last one where I sprained my ankle, and set myself up for a fracture.) I traveled with two friends, and one of them was my friend from Santa Clara. I hadn’t actually been with her in about a year and in that time she has changed a lot. She describes her new focus on exercise to be in line with all her peers at work. These are people who compare their weekend exploits of extreme cycling, running, and hiking. She says it is “the norm” for people in Silicon Valley to be this way and that everyone is sharp and competitive. I just won’t fit in with that.

I do need to get back into exercising more regularly, but I’m just not competitive. My friend’s new outlook put some strain on our interactions during the vacation, and made it clear to me that I simply could not live with that in my face all day, every day.

Second, it looks like I have some good project opportunities through our San Francisco office. I’ve already been working on a project where the sponsor is located in SF, and which promises to grow. My boss’ boss is in SF, as well, and my boss is already thinking of ways to get me more integrated into that network. (My boss has been fantastic about supporting me and my desire to move. Although I won’t get my relocation reimbursed or a cost of living adjustment because this is a voluntary move, once he realized I was serious about wanting to leave Chicago he has been clearing the way for me. And while I won’t get a raise, I will be placing myself on a new scale simply by moving to a higher cost of living area, which means I won’t top out of the pay scale for my grade anytime soon.)

While I’m happy to work in San Francisco, I just can’t see myself living there. It is much too expensive for me right now. Housing is expensive through the Bay area, but SF is pretty much top of the scale. So I’ve switched tactics a bit and am mostly looking for housing in East Bay now. I’m finding that the housing stock is more varied. There are older buildings that may not be as updated but that are more like the housing here in Chicago. Living in a vintage building without a dishwasher is nothing new to me, and it’s a trade-off I’m willing to make for a (hopefully) reduced rent and less hassle about my dog.

Ah, yes, there is the dog to worry about. My dog is nearly 12 years old now, yet she is still very healthy. When I adopted her at approximately 10-months of age, I guessed that she may live to be about 12 because of her size. She’s not enormous, but she is 50 pounds and larger dogs live shorter lives than little lap dogs. Her robust health sort of surprises me. We just spent a bunch at the vet’s this week because she was acting listless and not wanting to eat earlier this week. Turned out she was severely constipated and needing a good cleaning out. Since we had to peek inside her with the x-ray anyway, the doc pointed out she has very healthy-looking internal organs and no sign of arthritis in her back, either. She’s back to being her normal, perky self now, and it sounds like she’ll be that way for a few more years.

While the dog has mellowed quite a bit and is much more tractable since being the only dog in the household, she still has a negative reaction to most other dogs. Plus she’s a mutt and at least one of the likely breeds in her bloodline (cattle dog) is considered undesirable in some apartment complexes. This could be most problematic at corporate-run apartments, which are the majority in Silicon Valley. In East Bay, I may have other options.

Then there is B to think about. I don’t yet know if he will be moving with me. It’s possible he won’t. I don’t want to write much about it here right now, other than to note that I’ve told him I simply can’t afford to move him and pay for anything larger than a one-bedroom apartment; if he wants to continue living with me and wants a bigger apartment, he has to be kicking in more rent.

Since I’m not planning on packing up my entire house and will pare my belongings down a lot, I’ve even been thinking that it may be good to move in as someone’s roommate at first. Pros are that I wouldn’t have to invest in any furniture right away and I wouldn’t be as lonely while I build my new network of friends and acquaintances. (Yes, I know that roommates don’t always become BFFs, but it is nice to know there is another person around and that you are not completely isolated.) Cons are that I could end up hating the experience and having to tough it out for the terms of the lease.

Well, it does no harm sit here and dream and set some positive intentions that I’ll find a great place to live, right? Ideally, here is the type of living situation I’d be able to secure:

  • An apartment in a house/duplex/triplex
  • Access to a yard
  • Welcoming of my dog
  • Ability to garden/grow food in the yard
  • Maybe ability to share a flock of chickens in the yard?
  • Close to public transportation over to SF (the BART, AC Transit, or a ferry (I particularly like that last one; it sounds romantic to commute by ferry!)
  • Good walk score and ability to get groceries and visit restaurants/cafes on foot

I’m thinking that North Oakland or Berkeley may fit the bill, and I’m also looking at Alameda. I know that Oakland doesn’t have the most pristine reputation, but I am not a “delicate flower” when it comes living situations. I’m used to living in a diverse (and what may be considered by some people as not completely “safe”) neighborhood, although I also don’t want to take unnecessary risks with my self or my property. It seems that the neighborhoods in North Oakland (like Temescal, Rockridge/Claremont, and Piedmont/Montclair) may be pretty decent.

In one week I’ll get my chance to find out a bit more because I’m flying out to San Jose and staying at my Santa Clara friend’s place for several days. (Assuming I am out of this big boot and able to walk, that is!) I’m calling it a “scouting trip” and I’ll be spending my days working out of our office in San Jose and/or San Francisco, and my after work hours and off days looking at neighborhoods (and perhaps even apartments). It’s too early to actually sign a lease, but it doesn’t hurt to get a look at the housing stock.

If anyone knows the area and has suggestions, please add them in the comments! I’m open to hearing opinions and getting tips on pretty much anything related to living in the Bay area.

My (troublesome) left foot

Am I the only person with a body part that seems to fail regularly and/or attract catastrophe on a regular basis?

I’m currently wearing a large Air Walker cast on my lower left leg because I fractured my ankle. If I understood the doctor at immediate care correctly, I have what is called a lateral malleolus fracture of the fibula. As ankle fractures go, it could be worse. I don’t require surgery and I’m not in extreme pain. But I am stuck with hobbling around on crutches for now.

The first time I injured this ankle was when I was about 10 or 12. I was running full-out after another child when I stepped wrong and ended up on the ground. I spent that evening in the ER with my mother watching Saturday Night Live and waiting to see a doctor. The diagnosis was a sprained ankle, so I  got a pass on playing softball that summer. 🙂

Since that time, I’ve “turned” this ankle many times. In high school, I remember injuring it badly again and having to use crutches to get around for several weeks. And about 2 1/2 years ago I turned/sprained it while walking in flats on a sidewalk in Asheville, North Carolina.

Besides all these sprains, I’ve also broken a metatarsal in my left foot. I wish I could say I was doing something more exciting than taking a shortcut across the bedroom by walking on the bed, though. At the time I broke my left foot I was a newlywed and my (now ex-) husband ended up pushing me around in a wheel chair a lot because after using crutches for only a week my right leg and hip were injured from bearing all my weight.

This current injury was started while I was on vacation with friends in Maine over Memorial Day weekend. I was nearing the end of a hiking trail in Acadia National Park and sprained the ankle while picking my way down a sheet of granite on the trail. The friend hiking behind me had some familiarity with ankle injuries. After feeding me ibuprofen, helping me upright, and determining that I could actually stand on the affected foot, she helped me hobble to the end of the trail.

The ankle swelled extensively and my friends took me back to the cottage we were renting where I spent the rest of the day on the couch with my foot elevated on a pile of pillows and occasionally icing it. We wrapped the foot and I spent the next week taking ibuprofen, occasionally icing, and wrapping the foot. I also curtailed my walking. (I found that Boston is a very walkable city…if one can actually handle all the walking!)

I returned from vacation last weekend with a still swollen and slightly achy ankle, but I seemed to be able to keep to a normal level of activity. Until last Monday, that is. I was on my way to the gym to work with the trainer and was hurrying through the parking lot because it was raining heavily. I stepped on some uneven pavement, the injured ankle twisted again, and down I went. I think I screamed. I know I cried because it really, really hurt.

Some kind people helped me up out of the puddle I was sitting in and got me into the gym. The gym staff settled me in a chair and packed ice around my ankle, and after I had some time to breathe, stop crying, and think I called B to pick me up and take me to immediate care.

There were a couple of exams and some x-rays, and then the crutches and the Air Walker boot were brought in for me to gear up and be discharged. I go back to the doctor next week for a re-check and am hoping the news about my potential for mobility is better. I was told on Monday that it will take 4 to 6 weeks for the break to heal.

I’m hoping that I’m allowed to walk without crutches at or shortly before the 4 week mark because I have a confirmed reservation to fly to San Jose, CA at the end of June. My plans for San Jose are two-fold: pet-sit/house-sit for a friend while she is off on a hiking trip, and scout the neighborhoods in South Bay and East Bay in preparation for a move at the end of the year. Both of those activities are going to be very difficult (if not impossible) if I’m on crutches.

Being off my feet has thrown off my plans for the next month. I wanted to continue my aggressive down-sizing of stuff in my basement, but that is simply impossible while I’m confined to crutches. I’m trying not to injure my right hip like I did when I broke the left foot, so I need to be extra careful about how much “crutching” around I’m doing.

I’m thankful that I can telecommute for work, and that I’m able to secure help from friends. B has been keeping me fed and caffeinated, as well as continued to care for the pets (chickens and dog). A friend from the stable has come over to finish off the seasonal yard work I haven’t had a chance to do, and a neighbor has offered me the use of some home health aids like a shower chair.

I’m going to have to be very patient with myself and trust that my plans for the rest of the year will turn out OK despite this set back. *sigh*