Rooster introduction

I’ve finally taken the plunge and introduced the little rescue rooster to the hens.

Standard advice is to quarantine a new bird about a month before introducing it to your flock. I kept the rooster in a separate coop for only about 10 days before introducing him to the hens. I decided to take the chance because I had seen no signs of any illness or problems: his feathers and plumage were in very good condition, he had no discharge from his eyes or nostrils, and his droppings were normal and showed no signs of worms.

B took a video of this initial introduction. I think the rooster (we’re calling him Rory after the neighbor who suggested we rescue him) is a bit overwhelmed with the hens here.

Yesterday afternoon I took the final step of integrating him with the flock. I let him roam the yard with the hens and then put them all to bed in the main coop. There’s still a bit of adjusting to do, but they’ll all work it out.

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7 thoughts on “Rooster introduction

  1. Pretty birds. Thanks for the fence tips… I have stockade fence that is 6Ft tall on 3 sides of the yard but wasn’t sure what to put up on the last side. I did notice that the farmer’s fence was very high too.

    It’s hard to believe this video was shot in Chicago. Looks so rural. The only giveaway is the sound of the jets in the background.

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    • I live in one of the outer neighborhoods where it is mostly single family homes with yards. There aren’t many fun restaurants or cafes to which I can walk, but the price was right and I love my garden/yard. Luckily I don’t hear the O’Hare air traffic inside the house. 🙂

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    • You are absolutely, right! He does look overwhelmed and out of his league here. The second meeting was a bit different. He tried to rush/jump the hens, but they were having none of that! A good rooster learns to approach the ladies with respect and offer them some yummies first (for chickens, the best yummies are bugs). I guess it’s not much different for people, although our yummies tend to be things like chocolates, wine, and fine dining! 😉

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